Women also perceive very dominant males as more likely to cheat and divert resources away from the family.

A new study proposes that it’s entirely attributable to female choice.

Women evolved to prefer cooperative, emotionally nurturing providers over physically dominant males: Pair bonding supplanted promiscuity in human evolution when faithful females began choosing good providers as mates, a study finds.

Evolutionary biologists have struggled to explain how pair bonding and the nuclear family structure took root in humans, as primate groups typically establish dominance-driven hierarchies that restrict mating privileges to a few high-ranking males.…Using simple mathematical models, Sergey Gavrilets revealed that the most commonly proposed theories for human pair bonding are biologically unrealistic.

Furthermore, social dominance is not conferred by women, it’s awarded by other men in a process of intrasexual competition for dominance and leadership.

Men continually compete for dominance in social interactions with one another.

The men who achieve the greatest rank among their peers may then display that dominance as a powerful advantage in attracting women for sex.

On the other hand, women associate very masculine faces with negative traits such as coldness and dishonesty.

In any discussion of what women want, no trait gets more attention than social status.

Acknowledged as a key female attraction cue, it’s also frequently referred to as social dominance. One need only look around to see that men in positions of leadership and social dominance are highly desired by women.

Ogi Ogas, in his bestselling book Study after study has demonstrated the erotic appeal of male dominance.

Women prefer the voices of dominant men, the scent of dominant men, the movement and gait of dominant men, and the facial features of dominant men…Scientists believe that the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may be responsible for processing cues indicating social status or dominance, and it appears that almost all female brains are susceptible to dominance cues.