The idea is to use the first line near the beginning of your macro, and then use the second line near the end.Thus, the main body of your macro can do its work behind the scenes without the necessity of stopping to update the screen.Excel Tips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training.

Many times the macro may do quite a bit with the data, such as selecting different cells, replacing values or formulas, and taking other types of actions.

This means that the Excel screen can look like it has "gone crazy" while the macro is running.

One thing you may want to do with your macro to make it run faster and to prevent distracting flashes on the screen is to turn off screen updating while the macro is running.

The following macro lines will, respectively, turn off screen updating and then turn it back on in a VBA macro.

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013.

If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you.

For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Turning Off Screen Updating.

Many people write their own macros to manipulate the information in a workbook.

You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Turning Off Screen Updating. Featuring the friendly and trusted For Dummies style, this popular guide shows beginners how to get up and running with Excel while also helping more experienced users get comfortable with the newest features. A simple and less involved method of providing progress updates would be to use the following line of code in the macro: Application. Prior to "End Sub", place this last line of code: Application. Screen Updating = False, the statusbar will change.] This does the side effect that it looks as though Excel has "hung" or crashed, especially if the macros is going to take some time to execute.

For long macros I would advocate displaying a Userform saying "Please Wait" and for very long macros showing a progress bar or percentage complete, and maybe even a "Cancel" button to exit before completion.

Whenever you have a task to automate, you can usually go down the VBA route. Maybe later you add some features here-and-there, making your VBA code more powerful. Color = vb White End If i = i + 1 Next cell ' offset i to alternate column coloring i = i + 1 Next repeat Msg Box "Total time was: " & (Timer - start Time) End Sub Before moving on, let’s get a better understanding of why this is taking so long. Color = vb White End If i = i + 1 Next cell ' offset i to alternate column coloring i = i + 1 Next repeat Msg Box "Total time was: " & (Timer - start Time) Application.