Historically, he said these kinds of boundary-crossing liaisons have already occurred much in Southeast Asia, which is a crossroads of many cultures.“In the contemporary milieu, it is the freedom, vibrancy and comparative anonymity found in metropolitan centres where individuals often find the courage to push the boundaries of conventional social behaviour and racialised interpersonal relations if they so choose,” he said in an e-mail interview.

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“One quote that I often hear is ‘A family that prays together, stays together’,” she told obtained during street interviews appeared to support this, as the millennials’ readiness to date outside of their race did not extend so freely towards going out with people of other faiths.“When couples have the same religion, and belief, it’s easier.

It doesn’t matter if they marry a Muslim or someone from another religion,” 29-year-old Nurzianty Abdullah told .

In Malaysia, Shariah law essentially requires Muslims to only wed other Muslims, meaning that interfaith relationships must end in Islam if marriage comes into the picture.

The Edit: Luc Besson guilty of plagiarising action classic Dzulkifli needs your support, Abu Kassim tells MACC officers Midfield general Schweinsteiger quits Germany duty Ikea Malaysia recalls more chocolates on allergy fears KUALA LUMPUR, May 24 — They are a generation that has developed a reputation for narcissism and given the world numerous sexual abbreviations such as NSA, DTF, and FWB (Google is your friend here, Gen X-ers and baby boomers).

But is that image of self indulgence and casual relationships deserved?

According to an online survey by , the answer is yes and no.

When it comes to dating, these 18 to 32-year-olds said it is “less formal, less obligations, less expectations and less familial pressure” compared to previous generations.

In the survey, over nine in 10 respondents said they would date someone from another race but one in 10 said religion would stop them from dating someone.

Many of the millennials when interviewed, told that the benefit of dating someone from outside your race is the opportunity to learn about a different culture.“I love getting to know somebody with a different culture, with a different religion, something different from my own because there is so much to learn about the person,” one of the survey participants, 29-year-old Choo May Kuen said in an interview.

Senior lecturer at Monash University Dr Yeoh Seng Guan said the survey results were not surprising as it is a global trend where for the younger generation, especially living in cosmopolitan and metropolitan centres, conventional social identity markers like ethnicity, religion and place of origin, matter less than “individual self-fulfilment” and “interpersonal compatibility”.

This correlation is not necessarily automatic nor is it a “radically new trend”, he pointed out.